Andy Bohuslavizki | Irvine | Orange County Business | Great Hire

Andy Bohuslavizki |Dow 20,000 Will Be A Market You Can Sell

Andy Bohuslavizki | Jan 2017

Once the Dow Jones industrial average hits 20,000, don’t expect momentum to power it even higher, market strategist Paul Schatz told CNBC on Thursday.

In fact, it’s “a rally you can sell,” the president of Heritage Capital said in an interview with “Closing Bell.”

Stocks ended lower on Thursday, with the Dow Jones industrial average down about 63 points at 19,891.

The market has rallied since President-elect Donald Trump‘s victory in November, with investors pinning their hopes on tax cuts, less regulation and a pro-growth environment.

However, it has been going sideways for a month, Schatz pointed out.

“That shows we’ve got underlying strength,” he said. “The rally’s been on less stocks participating the last couple of weeks. We need a little bit more consolidation, digestion, maybe into halfway through earnings season.”

He’s confident that if Trump “stops tweeting” and let’s Congress take over, a substantial conversation will occur.

“Then we can hit 21,000, maybe early second quarter,” Schatz predicted.

Business | CRM | Andy Bohuslavizki | Irvine

Another source of information on this topic can be found here.

Origin Of Key Clinton E-mails A Mystery

https://www.yahoo.com/news/origin-key-clinton-emails-report-mystery-185807950–election.html?nhp=1

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was supposed to have turned over all work-related emails to the State Department to be released to the public. But an agency audit found at least three emails never seen before — including Clinton’s own explanation of why she wanted her emails kept private.

After 14 months of public scrutiny and skepticism over Clinton’s motives in keeping her emails secret, new questions emerged Thursday. They centered on her apparent failure to turn over a November 2010 message in which she worried that her personal messages could become accessible to outsiders, along with two other messages a year later that divulged possible security weaknesses in the home email system she used while secretary of state.

The Clinton campaign has previously denied that her home server was breached, but newly revealed emails show an aide worried it could have been compromised.

The existence of these previously unreleased messages — which appear to have been found among electronic files of four former top Clinton State Department aides — renews concerns that Clinton was not completely forthcoming when she turned over a trove of 55,000 pages of work-related emails. And it has drawn fresh criticism from presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

On Thursday, Clinton said she had been forthcoming with her personal emails.

“I have provided all of my work-related emails, and I’ve asked that they be made public, and I think that demonstrates that I wanted to make sure that this information was part of the official records,” Clinton said, according to an interview transcript provided by ABC News.

Most of those messages have been made public by the State Department over the past year due to both a court order and Clinton’s willingness to turn them over. But hundreds were censored for national security reasons and 22 emails were completely withheld because the agency said they contained top secret material — a matter now under investigation by the FBI.

Clinton said in March 2015 that she would turn over all work-related emails to the State Department after removing private messages that contained personal and family material. “No one wants their personal emails made public and I think most people understand that and respect their privacy,” she said after her exclusive use of private emails to conduct State Department business was confirmed by media reports.

Senate investigators have asked for numerous emails about Clinton’s server as part of their own inquiry into Clinton’s email practices in recent months, but they didn’t get copies of key messages made public by the State Department’s own watchdog this week, a senior Republican senator said Thursday.

“It is disturbing that the State Department knew it had emails like this and turned them over to the inspector general, but not to Congress,” said Iowa Sen. Charles Grassley, the chair of the Senate judiciary committee that’s been probing Clinton’s use of a private server.

The emails appear to contain work-related passages, raising questions about why they were not turned over to the State Department last year. The inspector general noted that Clinton’s production of work-related emails was “incomplete,” missing not only the three emails but numerous others covering Clinton’s first four months in office.

The inspector general also found Clinton’s email set up violated agency policies and could have left sensitive government information vulnerable to cyberattacks. But Thursday, Clinton told ABC News her use of the personal email was “allowed,” saying that “the rules have been clarified since I left.”

The Clinton campaign permitted one reporter from ABC News to ask the candidate questions. Other outlets were later provided with a transcript. A spokesman for the Clinton campaign did not respond to emailed questions Thursday. An inspector general’s spokesman declined to discuss the report.

The report said the inspector general was able to reconstruct some of Clinton’s missing emails by searching the email files of four former Clinton aides who had turned over thousands of pages of communications in 2015 at the request of the State Department, which is defending itself in multiple public records lawsuits, including one filed by The Associated Press. The four aides who turned over those files, according to the report, were Clinton’s former chief of staff, Cheryl Mills, and top aides Huma Abedin, Jake Sullivan and Philippe Reines.

Abedin was the aide who authored the key email in November 2010 that provoked Clinton’s concerns about outsiders obtaining her personal emails. After the State Department’s computer spam filters apparently prevented Clinton from sending a message to all department employees from her private server, Abedin suggested that she either open an official agency email or make her private address available to the agency.

Clinton told Abedin she was open to getting a separate email address but didn’t want “any risk of the personal being accessible.” Clinton never used an official State Department address, only using several private addresses to communicate. Abedin, Mills, Sullivan and Reines all also used private email addresses to conduct business, along with their government accounts.

Two other emails sent to Abedin were cited in the inspector general’s report, but also did not turn up among the emails released by Clinton. Those messages to Abedin contained warnings in January 2011 from an unidentified aide to former President Bill Clinton who said he had to shut down Hillary Clinton’s New York-based server because of suspected hacking attacks.

In response, Abedin warned Mills and Sullivan not to email Clinton “anything sensitive” and said she would “explain more in person.”

___

Gap to Close 175 Stores, cut jobs at headquarters 06/15/2015

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/gap-close-175-stores-cut-203722650.html

Gap fired creative director Rebekka Bay in January, eliminating the position in the process. In February, the company hired Wendi Goldman, former co-president at L Brands Inc’s (LB.N) Victoria Secret, as executive vice president of Gap’s product design and development team.

Jeff Kirwan was named the Gap division’s global president in December.

Gap said it expected to close 175 of the 675 specialty stores under the Gap label over the next few years, resulting in annual sales losses of about $300 million.

The company also said it expects to incur one-time costs of $140 million to $160 million, primarily in the current quarter.

Gap reported sales of $16.44 billion for the year ended Jan. 31.

After the closures, Gap will have 500 specialty Gap stores in North America, as well as 300 outlet stores. The company also said it plans to close some stores in Europe, but did not specify how many.

Shake Shack: Hold The Pickles, Sell The Stock- Andy Bohuslavizki

102385342-RTR4NNCE_530x298

Shake Shack is planning to open hundreds of new locations over the next several years.

The burger chain, which recently went public, now has 36 restaurants in the US that are primarily located on the East Coast. The company is planning to eventually open 450 locations in the US.

Shake Shack hasn’t revealed many details on where it will expand next, so Goldman Sachs used Google search trends to gauge where consumer interest is highest.

Based on those maps, California, Oklahoma, Missouri, North Carolina, and Washington could be the next states to get a Shake Shack. Search traffic was also particularly high in Texas, where the company is planning to expand this year.

Here are the search trends mapped out by Goldman Sachs.

screen%20shot%202015-02-24%20at%2011_15_00%20am

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/where-shake-shack-could-be-expanding-next-2015-2#ixzz3SgsymRHC

Andy Bohuslavizki-Apple I Phone 6 Release Set For August 2014

As rumors suggest that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) could release two models of its next-generation iPhone, dubbed the iPhone 6, with larger screen sizes this year, a new report said Friday that the California tech giant could debut the 4.7-inch version of the iPhone 6 as soon as in August, following up with a bigger model in September.

On Friday, Reuters cited a report from Taiwan’s Economic Daily News, saying that Apple could surprise the tech world by releasing the iPhone 6 with a 4.7-inch screen in August, one month earlier than the company’s usual iPhone release cycle. The report also said a 5.5-inch or 5.6-inch iPhone 6 model is expected to reach stores in September.

If Apple indeed launches a new iPhone in August, it would be a different strategy for the company, which launched the past three versions of the flagship smartphone in September or October, MacRumors reported. The site added that the current news also contradicts earlier reports, claiming that the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 could be launched in September, while the 5.5-inch version could be delayed until later this year or early 2015 due to production issues.

The report from the Economic Daily News in question also stated that Apple would produce 80 million iPhone 6 units in 2014, with the company’s suppliers, including Foxconn Technology Co. Ltd. (TPE:2354) and Largan Precision Co., Ltd. (TPE:3008), aiding with assembly and camera module production, respectively.

On Wednesday, it was reported that Pegatron Corporation (

Twitter IPO Still Has Huge Question Marks Looming

The Goldman Sachs Tower - Jersey city, NJ.

The Goldman Sachs Tower – Jersey city, NJ. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Andy Bohuslavizki

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Twitter Inc shares slipped on Monday after some of the five lead underwriters of its initial public offering said the social media firm may not achieve Facebook-like scale and its stock may not rise much higher.

In their first research reports since the November IPO, only Deutsche Bank and Goldman Sachs recommended buying the stock. Morgan Stanley and JP Morgan issued the equivalent of “hold” ratings. One analyst, Justin Post of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, initiated coverage with a sell rating and valued shares at $36 (£22.01), according to theflyonthewall.com.

Twitter shares dipped 1.3 percent to $41 on Monday. After an explosive debut on November 7, when shares closed more than 70 percent above the $26 IPO price, Twitter has churned for weeks in the low $40s.

At $41, the San Francisco-based company still trades at roughly 20 times estimated 2014 revenues, a multiple that dwarfs that of social media peers like Facebook Inc and LinkedIn Corp at roughly 11 and 17.6 times, respectively.

Firms that played a role in the IPO were not allowed to issue recommendations on the stock during a three-week span following the IPO known as the “quie t period.” Their projections, published Monday, added little clarity to the debate over a fast-growing but still unprofitable company that has divided opinion on Wall Street.

Twitter’s IPO was easily the most highly anticipated technology offering since Facebook’s in 2012. Some on Wall Street have questioned whether Twitter will ever gain the same kind of vast user base Google Inc and Facebook have relied on to grow their businesses.

“The biggest unknown is that TWTR may be a niche product and won’t break through to the mainstream, and may never see MAUs up near the 1B+ levels of mega-platforms like GOOG and FB,” Deutsche Bank analyst Ross Sandler wrote in reference to the more than one billion users of both Facebook and Google. Sandler, the most bullish of the five analysts who kicked off coverage on Monday, put a $50 price target on the stock.

Although Twitter has rapidly revved up its revenue engine in the past year, investors are counting on it to continue delivering significant top-line gains. The company said last month that revenue in the third quarter more than doubled from a year ago to $168.6 million.

Goldman Sachs analysts led by Heath Terry saw “substantial opportunity” for growth acceleration even above Twitter’s current pace as it expands internationally, thus justifying Goldman’s $46 price target.

Goldman was the lead underwriter on Twitter’s IPO.

“While competition for users’ time is fierce and Twitter’s growth trajectory is unlikely to be linear, we believe these revisions will, over time, justify considerable upside beyond the share current price and valuation,” Terry wrote.

Eight out of 22 analysts so far issued a hold rating on Twitter, while nine recommended “buy” and 5 “sell,” according to Thomson Reuters data.

J.P. Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth, who valued shares at $40, warned that the stock was priced at a “significant premium” to Facebook and LinkedIn.

He said, however, that the fundamentals of Twitter’s business appeared promising. Twitter, which has so far pinned its business model on real-time, brand advertising campaigns that accompany television programs, has yet to tap into smaller businesses that want to buy ads themselves or monetize its popular video-sharing app Vine.

“We look for new initiatives like Twitter Cards and Twitter Amplify to be strong growth drivers,” Anmuth said. “We believe there is also strong monetization potential in Twitter’s self-serve platform, retargeting, the MoPub mobile ad exchange, and Vine.”

 

Andy Bohuslavizki- Bitcoin

The bitcoin logo

The bitcoin logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Andy Bohuslavizki- Bitcoin (sign: BitcoinSign.svg; code: BTC) is a cryptocurrency where the creation and transfer of bitcoins is based on an open-source cryptographic protocol that is independent of any central authority. Bitcoins can be transferred through a computer or smartphone without an intermediate financial institution.[7] The concept was introduced in a 2008 paper by pseudonymous developer Satoshi Nakamoto, who called it a peer-to-peer, electronic cash system.[1][8][9]

The processing of Bitcoin transactions is secured by servers called bitcoin miners. These servers communicate over an internet-based network and confirm transactions by adding them to a ledger which is updated and archived periodically using peer-to-peer filesharing technology.[2] In addition to archiving transactions, each new ledger update creates some newly minted bitcoins. The number of new bitcoins created in each update is halved every 4 years until the year 2140 when this number will round down to zero. At that time no more bitcoins will be added into circulation and the total number of bitcoins will have reached a maximum of 21 million bitcoins.[1][10] To accommodate this limit, each bitcoin is subdivided down to eight decimal places; forming 100 million smaller units called satoshis per bitcoin.[4]

Bitcoin is accepted in trade by merchants and individuals in many parts of the world. Like other currencies, illicit drug and gambling transactions constitute some of its commercial usage.[11][12][13][14] Although the bitcoin is promoted as a digital currency, many commentators have criticized the bitcoin’s volatile exchange rate, relatively inflexible supply, and minimal use in trade